Projects

Before a trail is constructed, it must go through several phases.   Trail implementation process.

The first step is to identify the trail as a planning concept.  At this stage, the idea for a trail has been raised but very little research has been completed regarding property ownership, physical constraints, environmental constraints, or public opinion.  These trails ranked the lowest in priority and are the furthest from implementation.   Of the 322 total miles of trails included in the Lake County Trails Network, approximately 152 miles are considered a planning concept.

The next phase of the process is planning.  During the planning phase, potential right-of-way is identified and targeted, physical and environmental constraints are identified, and conceptual solutions to the constraints are developed.  The outcome of the planning process is generally an alignment and identification of critical environmental, design, right-of-way, and physical issues necessary for implementation of the trail. The trails that ranked the highest in priority were carried to this level of analysis.

These trails will in most cases be implemented within the 20-year goal for the Lake County Trails Master Plan. The information developed for these trails is included in Section 7.0 of this report and will be used byLakeCounty, municipalities, and other agencies to protect the right-of-way and incorporate the trail into other public and private projects. The implementation of these trails is discussed more fully in Section 6.0 of this report.  These trails are identified in Figure 5-8 as “Planned” trails.  Of the 322 total miles of trails included in the Lake County Trails Network, approximately 98 miles are considered planned.

The next phase of trail implementation is called a study.  This is often conducted as a Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study as intended to meet the requirements of NEPA and qualify a project for state and federal funding.  The information contained in these studies is at a greater level of detail than necessary for a trails master plan so no additional analysis was conducted.  These trails are identified in Figure 5-8 as “Study Complete”.  Of the 322 total miles of trails included in the Lake County Trails Network, approximately 50 miles have a study complete.